Hustle, grind, Facebook, LinkedIn, Insta, WhatsApp, Snap, Blogs, Video, PR… wow, it’s no wonder so many solo business owners are feeling the pressure. Read on and I’ll tell you how it’s entirely possible to build your audience and create clients without spinning too many plates.

THIS one’s for everyone running their own business, trying to spin all those plates AND keep up with social media. Particularly if you’re a coach, healer or therapist, the pressure to keep sharing good content and become ubiquitous, online and off, can feel immense.

Actually, this is true for most small businesses and solo entrepreneurs. Everyone’s telling us that we need to market ourselves, turn up our visibility and create new clients, and that’s true, but there needs to be balance.

Remember there’s only one of you and you can’t do everything at once. You need to give yourself breathing room.

Let me give you a for instance… I might look like I’m spinning crazy amounts of plates 24/7, but it’s actually just clever posting.

I don’t live on any of the social channels — I’m a visitor, not a resident. I post relevant content, then check to see if I need to engage in ‘dead time’ — natural breaks — and yes, you do have those.

Time management

For something like engaging on Twitter, I’d schedule myself in solid blocks of time.

I post on LinkedIn — and spend time engaging with other people’s content — every morning, then check back through the day, when time allows. It’s the first hour after you post that’s really important — reply to every comment in that window, then you can relax a little more.

I don’t spend all my time on social media. I carve out time to post, to engage, then check back in during natural breaks.

I don’t spend hours scrolling through Facebook’s feed, checking what my pals are up to or diving into drama.

I post on my pages, I reply to comments on my content, I look after my own groups and occasionally share into, and engage with, groups that are relevant for my audience.

The same could be said for any of my social feeds. I engage regularly — but I don’t live there.

Don’t be distracted by all the noise

This is the number one reason people start to feel overwhelmed. It’s not that social media is bad — used properly, it’s bloody awesome — it’s just that everyone’s shouting at the same time and, instead of using blinkers and ear plugs, we try to listen to everyone at once.

We get distracted by the sob stories, the networking group politics, the funnels, marketing systems and millionaire mindset ‘opportunities’. Shiny Object Syndrome (and people pleasing) pulls us away from our intentions far too frequently, and then we start to panic.

When the panic sets in, we start shaving top line advice from everyone who tells us they know best, try to do a bit of everything the ‘successful’ people seem to be doing, and end up doing lots of little things badly.

Again, it’s time to breathe.

Pick a lane.

Pick YOUR OWN lane.

Again, it’s time to breathe. Pick a lane. Pick YOUR OWN lane.

The more you hone in on looking after your own channels and tribe, instead of being distracted by everyone else’s, the more you’ll be able to focus your heart and mind on creating the content that will draw people to you.

It’s a crazy idea, isn’t it? If we’re disciplined enough to focus on our own stuff, and do it über well, we might just end up growing our own tribe. And our own business. And our own bottom line. You might even start filling your events. Fancy that!

It’s easier to create than wait

Want another reason to take a step back and refocus your intentions away from your personal Facebook feed?

It’s easy to get caught up in the hype and spend all day staring at the screen, waiting to pounce on opportunities. If you just keep watching those groups, somebody might post about a problem you and your business could solve — it could mean a new client! Yeah, sure, but it’s the modern day equivalent of placing an ad in Yellow Pages and staring at the phone.

How many hours are you wasting watching and waiting, instead of being clear about what you want, on what your audience needs, and creating your own content accordingly?

You don’t need to sit there and wait for opportunities. If you’re putting out good quality content, that should create leads and conversations for you.

You don’t need to sit there and wait for opportunities. If you’re putting out good quality content, that should create leads and conversations for you. It might not happen overnight — trust and advocacy don’t come about that quickly — but it’s better to create clients with your own conversations and content than keep waiting for that perfect smash n’ grab opportunity to present.

Outside of that, get into the habit of using searches on social channels and chipping into conversations that way — it’s much easier on your time, your eyeballs and your energy than constantly scrolling, just on the off chance that a relevant opportunity might appear on your screen.

You have to remember there’s a life outside of this and look after yourself so you don’t burn out.

Ssshhh… it’s a secret!

I don’t check and respond to my emails and messages 24/7 — there has to be a cut off for family time, or YOU time. I switched off for most of this last weekend. Apart from dipping into one of my Facebook groups and answering some LinkedIn comments, I switched off for much of Monday afternoon too.

You cannot do everything. That’s why it’s important to switch off from the massive social avalanche and just focus on you and your stuff.

I’ll tell you another secret too… all my alerts are turned off.

The more you build your brand and reputation, the more you’ll have people tugging on your sleeves and the more you’ll need to learn to discern between things that need your immediate attention and things that don’t. Your smartphone telling you every time someone breathes near one of your posts won’t help you to get clarity.

If you haven’t already, switch those alerts off and, instead, schedule the time to pop into the groups that are useful to you, and your own channels.

If you haven’t already, switch those alerts off and, instead, schedule the time to pop into the groups that are useful to you, and your own channels. Treat those important online spaces as rooms to pop into regularly — when YOU have time — and then you can safely remove the doorbells.

Seriously, folks, you would not believe the volume of emails, Facebook messages, LinkedIn InMails, Whatsapps etc I receive. And not just spam. This comes with building your personal brand — the more visible you become, particularly if you’re sharing good content, the more people will reach out.

Whether it’s requests for podcast interviews, people asking for “just 10 minutes of your time”, folks you’ve never met wanting to meet for coffee, people wanting to pitch ideas to you, asking for a job… it can feel pretty relentless.

If you’re looking to grow your personal brand and build on your audience and visibility, get into good habits now.

So, if you’re looking to grow your personal brand and build on your audience and visibility, get into good habits now.

Filter your time

Filter your time AND the demands on it.

Don’t feel the need to respond to everything within 10 minutes 24/7. You can set up auto responses on your business page messages if you need to and, if you find yourself getting really, really in demand, you can even outsource your email and messages to someone you trust, who can take control of them all and just give you the urgent ones to respond to. There are endless options as you grow, but that’s for later on.

For now, there’s no need to feel overwhelmed — you just need to turn off those alerts and check in routinely, when you have time.

I love social media, but sometimes I miss the days of snail mail, when nobody knew if you’d opened their letter, or at what time and how many times you’d re-read it, and the postman wasn’t badgering you for an immediate response.

I love social media, but sometimes I miss the days of snail mail, when nobody knew if you’d opened their letter, or at what time and how many times you’d re-read it, and the postman wasn’t badgering you for an immediate response.

It’s entirely possible to build your visibility and show off your personal brand without being a slave to other people’s online demands — you just need to nurture a little more discipline around how you spend your own minutes and how you approach Facebook et all.

Taz

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Taz Thornton is the author of Awesome Sauce — a free, weekly positive life and business round-up, with good news stories, positivity tips and visibility hacks for your brand. In a few minutes each week, you get a dose of optimism and some awesome advice to get seen and stay happy.

Taz is also a best-selling author, inspirational business speaker and consultant on confidence, personal brand and visibility, award-winning coach (UK’s Best Female Coach 2018 — Best Business Woman Awards), consultant and creator of the #UnleashYourAwesome and #BrandMastery personal and business development programmes, as well as #UNLEASHED — an affordable confidence, content and cashflow building programme for coaches, healers and therapists.

She has been featured on BBC, ITV, in HuffPost, Diva and countless other newspapers, magazines and podcasts. Taz is also a regular columnist for the America Out Loud talkshow network.

Find her on FacebookLinkedInTwitter and Insta.